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Catholic Church Authority

Sacred tradition is a theological term used primarily by Roman Catholics to refer to the fundamental basis of church authority.
The teachings of the Jesus and the Apostles are preserved in writing in the Bible as well as word of mouth and are handed on. This perpetual handing on of the Tradition is called a living Tradition; it is the transmission of the teachings of the Apostles from one generation to the next. The term “deposit of faith” refers to the entirety of Jesus Christ’s revelation, and is passed to successive generations in two different forms, sacred scripture (the Bible) and sacred tradition (apostolic succession)
In the theology of these churches, sacred scripture is the written part of this larger tradition, recording the community’s experience of God or more specifically of Jesus Christ. Hence the Bible must be interpreted within the context of sacred tradition and within the community of the church. Sacred tradition, and thus sacred scripture as well, are “inspired,” another technical theological term indicating that they contain and communicate the truths of faith and morals God intended to make known for mankind’s salvation. This is in contrast to many Protestant traditions, which teach that the Bible alone is a sufficient basis for all Christian teaching (a position known as sola scriptura).